Phonics



What is Jolly Phonics?



What is Jolly Phonics?

Jolly Phonics is a fun and child centred approach to teaching literacy through synthetic phonics. With actions for each of the 42 letter sounds, the multi-sensory method is very motivating for children and teachers, who can see their students achieve. The letter sounds are split into seven groups as shown below.

Letter Sound Order

The sounds are taught in a specific order (not alphabetically). This enables children to begin building words as early as possible.

How does Jolly Phonics work?

Using a synthetic phonics approach, Jolly Phonics teaches children the five key skills for reading and writing. The programme continues through school enabling the teaching of essential grammar, spelling and punctuation skills.

The five skills taught in Jolly Phonics

seven letter sounds

1.Learning the letter sounds

Children are taught the 42 main letter sounds. This includes alphabet sounds as well as digraphs such as sh, th, ai and ue.

2.Learning letter formation

Using different multi-sensory methods, children learn how to form and write the letters.

3.Blending

Children are taught how to blend the sounds together to read and write new words.

4.Identifying the sounds in words (Segmenting)

Listening for the sounds in words gives children the best start for improving spelling.

5.Tricky words

Tricky words have irregular spellings and children learn these separately.

For more information on Jolly Phonics products for teaching literacy visit our Products section. If you would like more information on using Jolly Phonics and for training courses or to invite a trainer to your school then please visit our Training Courses section. The literacy skills taught in Jolly Phonics are reinforced and built upon in with Jolly Grammar, which teaches essential grammar and spelling skills.


Phonological Awareness
 Phonological awareness skills are important in order to develop good reading skills. Having good phonological awareness skills means that a child is able to manipulate sounds and words, or “play” with sounds and words. For example, a teacher or speech-language pathologist might ask a child to break the word “cat” into individual sounds: “c-a-t.” Phonological awareness includes the following skills: • Recognizing when words rhyme (e.g., “Do ‘cat’ and ‘shoe’ rhyme?”) and coming up with a word that rhymes (e.g., “What rhymes with ‘key’?”) • Segmentation of words in sentences (e.g., “Clap for each word you hear in the sentence ‘The dog is furry.’”) • Blending syllables (e.g., “I am going to say parts of a word. Tell me what the word is. ‘Pan-da.’”) • Segmentation of syllables (e.g., “Clap for each syllable you hear in the word ‘refrigerator.’”) • Deletion of syllables (e.g., “Say the word ‘strawberry.’ Now say it without saying ‘straw.’”) • Identifying sounds in words (e.g., “What sound do you hear at the end of ‘tulip’?”) • Blending sounds (e.g., “Put these sounds together to make a word. ‘D-oo-r.’”) • Segmentation of sounds (e.g., “Tell me each sound you hear in the word ‘cat’?”) • Deletion of sounds (e.g., “Say ‘chair.’ Now say it without the ‘ch.’”) • Addition of sounds (e.g., “Say ‘cook.’ Now say it with an ‘e’ at the end.”) • Manipulation of sounds (e.g., “Change the ‘s’ in ‘sad’ to a ‘d’ and say the new word.”)

 Phonological awareness is important because it is a basis for reading. Children begin to read by listening to others read aloud, then recognizing sounds in words, sounding words out for themselves, recognizing familiar words, and so on. By engaging in word play, children learn to recognize patterns among words and use this knowledge to read and build words. The following is a list of ways to encourage children to play with sounds and words by practicing different types of patterns (e.g., ones you see, one you hear, or ones that involve movement, counting, and imitating). • Play traditional hand-clapping games such as “Patty Cake” and “Miss Mary Mack.” • Gather paper and crayons and have your child draw a picture of a rhyming sentence such as “Dad is glad,” or “A frog sat on the log.” Talk about the rhyming words and how they sound alike. Have the child think of other words that rhyme and make up his/her own sentence using new rhyming words. • Give the child four words, three of which rhyme. Ask the child to identify the word that does not rhyme. For example, if you said “bell, box, fell, tell,” the child would identify “box” as the word that does not rhyme with the others. • When reading books to your child that contain rhyming words, emphasize the rhyming words as you read. Dr. Seuss books are great for this activity. After reading a book, ask your child to remember as many of the rhyming words as he/she can. • While sitting around the dinner table, play a game of “Telephone.” Whisper a 5–7 word sentence in the person’s ear to your right and have that person whisper in the ear of the person to his/her right. Continue until each member of the dinner table has a chance to listen and whisper. The last person to hear the sentence says it aloud. • While riding in the car, say a sentence to your child but leave the last word blank. Ask your child to provide a rhyming word. For example, say “I see a dog on a _______.” Your child could say, “log,” “hog,” “bog,” or “frog.” • Tap out the individual words in a sentence. For the sentence, “The sun is shining,” you would tap or clap four times. When the child is able to count the words in a sentence, clap out the syllables in a word and then the sounds in a word. • Buy inexpensive beads and string at a craft store. Give your child some string and beads and have him or her tie a knot at one end. Say a word and have your child string one bead for each sound he/she hears in the word. You could also use this activity and have the child string beads on the string for each syllable he or she hears.  For example, the word “can” would receive three beads when counting sounds and one bead when counting syllables.

 Phonological Activities

Helful products for phonological awareness


Phonological Awareness
 Phonological awareness skills are important in order to develop good reading skills. Having good phonological awareness skills means that a child is able to manipulate sounds and words, or “play” with sounds and words. For example, a teacher or speech-language pathologist might ask a child to break the word “cat” into individual sounds: “c-a-t.” Phonological awareness includes the following skills: • Recognizing when words rhyme (e.g., “Do ‘cat’ and ‘shoe’ rhyme?”) and coming up with a word that rhymes (e.g., “What rhymes with ‘key’?”) • Segmentation of words in sentences (e.g., “Clap for each word you hear in the sentence ‘The dog is furry.’”) • Blending syllables (e.g., “I am going to say parts of a word. Tell me what the word is. ‘Pan-da.’”) • Segmentation of syllables (e.g., “Clap for each syllable you hear in the word ‘refrigerator.’”) • Deletion of syllables (e.g., “Say the word ‘strawberry.’ Now say it without saying ‘straw.’”) • Identifying sounds in words (e.g., “What sound do you hear at the end of ‘tulip’?”) • Blending sounds (e.g., “Put these sounds together to make a word. ‘D-oo-r.’”) • Segmentation of sounds (e.g., “Tell me each sound you hear in the word ‘cat’?”) • Deletion of sounds (e.g., “Say ‘chair.’ Now say it without the ‘ch.’”) • Addition of sounds (e.g., “Say ‘cook.’ Now say it with an ‘e’ at the end.”) • Manipulation of sounds (e.g., “Change the ‘s’ in ‘sad’ to a ‘d’ and say the new word.”)

 Phonological awareness is important because it is a basis for reading. Children begin to read by listening to others read aloud, then recognizing sounds in words, sounding words out for themselves, recognizing familiar words, and so on. By engaging in word play, children learn to recognize patterns among words and use this knowledge to read and build words. The following is a list of ways to encourage children to play with sounds and words by practicing different types of patterns (e.g., ones you see, one you hear, or ones that involve movement, counting, and imitating). • Play traditional hand-clapping games such as “Patty Cake” and “Miss Mary Mack.” • Gather paper and crayons and have your child draw a picture of a rhyming sentence such as “Dad is glad,” or “A frog sat on the log.” Talk about the rhyming words and how they sound alike. Have the child think of other words that rhyme and make up his/her own sentence using new rhyming words. • Give the child four words, three of which rhyme. Ask the child to identify the word that does not rhyme. For example, if you said “bell, box, fell, tell,” the child would identify “box” as the word that does not rhyme with the others. • When reading books to your child that contain rhyming words, emphasize the rhyming words as you read. Dr. Seuss books are great for this activity. After reading a book, ask your child to remember as many of the rhyming words as he/she can. • While sitting around the dinner table, play a game of “Telephone.” Whisper a 5–7 word sentence in the person’s ear to your right and have that person whisper in the ear of the person to his/her right. Continue until each member of the dinner table has a chance to listen and whisper. The last person to hear the sentence says it aloud. • While riding in the car, say a sentence to your child but leave the last word blank. Ask your child to provide a rhyming word. For example, say “I see a dog on a _______.” Your child could say, “log,” “hog,” “bog,” or “frog.” • Tap out the individual words in a sentence. For the sentence, “The sun is shining,” you would tap or clap four times. When the child is able to count the words in a sentence, clap out the syllables in a word and then the sounds in a word. • Buy inexpensive beads and string at a craft store. Give your child some string and beads and have him or her tie a knot at one end. Say a word and have your child string one bead for each sound he/she hears in the word. You could also use this activity and have the child string beads on the string for each syllable he or she hears.  For example, the word “can” would receive three beads when counting sounds and one bead when counting syllables.

 Phonological Activities
 Here are some Super Duper
®
Products that may be helpful tools when practicing
phonological awareness. Visit www.superduperinc.com or call 1-800-277-8737. Click the links
below to see the product and description.
Phonological Awareness Fun Park™
Webber
®
 Phonological Awareness Photo Combo
Webber
®
 Phonological Awareness Bingo
Funnel Toward Phonics™

Phonemic Awareness Fun Deck
®

Word Families with Silly Sentences Fun Deck
®


PHONICS 
Teach effective phonics using explicit, systematic instruction and practice.
Students must learn to match a unit of sound (a phoneme) to the letter or
 letters that make the sound (a grapheme). Separating the written word into
 its individual sounds and blending the individual sounds of letters to make
words is the foundation of reading.
More About Phonics DECODABLE BOOKS &
PHONICS LESSONS READ-ALOUD BOOKS SOUND/SYMBOL
BOOKS PHONOGRAM FLASHCARD http://www.readinga-z.com/phonics/


PHONICS READING

Phonics is a method for teaching reading and writing 
the English language by developing learners' phonemic awareness
the ability to hear, identify, and manipulate phonemes—in order to teach
 the correspondence between these sounds and the spelling patterns 
(graphemes) that represent them.

The goal of phonics is to enable beginning readers to decode new 
written words by sounding them out, or in phonics terms, blending
the sound-spelling patterns. Since it focuses on the spoken and 
written units within words, phonics is a sublexical approach and, 
as a result, is often contrasted with whole language
a word-level-up philosophy for teaching reading 
(see History and controversy below).

Since the turn of the 20th century phonics has been widely used in primary education and in teaching literacy throughout the English-speaking world. More specifically synthetic phonics is now the accepted method of teaching reading in the education systems in the UK and Australia.

http://www.abcfastphonics.com




Now the students in Year 1, 2 and 3 learn phonics in class. 
This website is a great help for students. There are games to
 help them read and many more. This really helps in my teaching.

2 comments:

cinderell@ said...

May I ask the phonic class isit available in Ipoh

WAYNE CHARLOTTE said...

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